THE 'HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT' (and why the3million opposes settled status)

Photograph by Rick Findler

The phrase 'Hostile Environment' is used a lot. But what does it mean exactly, who defines an 'illegal immigrant', and why does the3million say that the UK Government's proposed settled status brings EU citizens into the 'Hostile Environment'?

What is the Hostile Environment?

In May 2012, the then Home Secretary Theresa May said in a Telegraph interview: "The aim is to create here in Britain a really hostile environment for illegal migration... What we don't want is a situation where people think that they can come here and overstay because they're able to access everything they need."

The 'Hostile Environment' is a set of measures, both administrative and legislative, to make life so miserable for anyone without immigration status, that they will 'self-remove'. It includes limiting access to employment, housing, healthcare, confiscating a driving licence, freezing bank accounts, restricting rights of appeal against the Home Office's decisions. At the same time rules are made ever more complex (they have been called Byzantine in the Court of Appeal). And the Home Office has a tendency to appeal decisions then delay the appeal process unnecessarily, and there is even a history of non-compliance with orders of the courts. 

After the resignation of Home Secretary Amber Rudd following the Windrush scandal, new Home Secretary Sajid Javid renamed the 'Hostile Environment' the 'Compliant Environment', however, the same issues still exist.

Why is this relevant for EU citizens?

The Hostile Environment is already beginning to bite for some EU citizens. The Home Office has started deporting vulnerable EU citizens - see this article entitled "If someone is sleeping rough they need help - not deportation".

the3million is extremely concerned that the 'settled status' proposal puts all EU citizens in the UK (who currently have protection of EU law) at risk of being plunged into this hostile environment. Fundamentally, this is because, instead of having their existing rights certified, EU citizens are being asked to apply for a new status ('settled status' - which is an understood term within UK immigration law, being the same as 'indefinite leave to remain' which applies to non-EEA citizens).

And with applying comes the possibility and risk of being rejected.  Here are some potential examples of how someone could be rejected:

  • The Home Office simply makes a mistake.  Remember that their current error rate is 10%, and that's before they even attempt to start registering 3 million citizens.  The rejection rate of Permanent Residence applications is 29%, and the number of successful appeals against the Home Office is 50% - although these appeals can take around a year!

  • A citizen came to the UK as a child with their parents, and due to disability has never been able to work, and is dependent on healthcare (therefore is not 'self-sufficient' in the strict sense of the phrase).

  • Someone cannot gather the paperwork required for whatever reason. Imagine an elderly person, who had ILR (Indefinite Leave to Remain, before the days of EU citizenship) years ago but has long since lost the document or that old passport with a stamp in it - and has no record of work, no utility bills or council tax bills in their own name.  Even the Home Office has admitted they have not got those records of ILR.

  • A citizen doesn't fit the bill of a 'desirable immigrant' - this will of course never be admitted or discussed by the UK government - but homeless people, unregulated workers, sex workers and many more vulnerable groups can simply be rejected and will probably not benefit from positive media attention to get their rejections overturned - despite the fact that they may have lived in the UK for many years, and have no 'home' in another country to go back to.  The fact that these decisions can be down to individual case worker discretion is even more worrying.

  • Perhaps a minor criminal offence was committed in someone's past for which a sentence has been served - which should be the end of it.  However, that is not likely given the systematic criminal checks that the UK government is insisting on.  There are already claims that EU citizens are being detained for relatively minor crimes, such as driving offences.

How could an EU citizen fall into the Hostile Environment?

Whatever the reason, an EU citizen being rejected for settled status would at a stroke become an illegal immigrant, and face the full force of the hostile environment. Any rejection carries the risk of loss of access to justice, firstly through the proposed data protection exemption, and secondly because legal aid is not generally available in immigration cases. Meanwhile, EU citizens could suddenly face their bank accounts being frozen (Brandon Lewis confirmed this in November 2017 in a Home Affairs select committee under questioning from Yvette Cooper).  Their employer could be instructed to terminate their employment, their landlord could evict them, in short their lives could start spinning out of control.  See this hypothetical scenario that was written about Pierre and Sophia.   For more in-depth detail and links on the Home Office and the Hostile Environment, see this document

the3million fundamentally believes that for the finite group of EU citizens living in the UK before Brexit, their existing EU rights should be maintained, for a lifetime, and only proof of ID and residence should be required, nothing more. See our Alternative Proposal.

Below, you can find examples of the Hostile Environment in action - mostly applying to non-EEA citizens but this is what EU citizens could face if the 'settled status' proposal is accepted by the UK government and the European Commission.  It is important to realise that rules would also apply to British citizens currently living in the EU, should they wish to return to the UK with a non-British spouse and family after Brexit. 

We would argue these immensely unjust and inhumane laws should be revoked for all - level up citizens' rights instead of creating a race to the bottom for all.

A 'friendly' Valentine's Day tweet by the Home Office in 2013

Press

Department of Education criticised for secretly sharing children's data

Information commissioner acts after complaint that data is used for immigration enforcement

Read the article

Windrush victim dies without compensation or apology

Hubert Howard has died three weeks after being granted British citizenship, 59 years after arriving in UK

Read the article

The Windrush Betrayal by Amelia Gentleman — a story of injustice

An exposé of the government’s cruelty to a generation of immigrants asks: has anything really changed?

Read the article (if you hit the paywall, search for the title and it should let you in)

Opinion: The only way around the Home Office’s cruelty is to get your story in the news

It’s appalling that immigration appeals now depend so heavily on getting the media to notice your case: no publicity, no justice

Read the article

'A dizzying maze': how the UK immigration system is geared to reject

Navigating the roadblocks into Britain gets ever more difficult and expensive, as government hostility leaks into every transaction.

Read the (very long but essential) article

NHS doctor banned from coming back to UK over visa mix-up

Specialist stranded abroad after Home Office decision, amid chronic shortage of doctors

Read the article

Home Office 'infiltrating' safe havens to deport rough sleepers

The Home Office is using information gathered in “immigration surgeries” at charities and places of worship to deport vulnerable homeless people who are told that attending will help them get financial support. Attendees at ‘immigration surgeries’ at churches and centres told it won’t involve enforcement

Read the article

UK to deport academic to Democratic Republic of Congo – which she has never visited

Researcher being sent to country notorious for sexual violence, and second Oxford academic refused visa for young son

Read the article

Home Office 'doomed to repeat the mistakes of Windrush'

A report finds that the government must urgently hit the reset button to ensure the Windrush generation mistakes are not repeated, and the new home secretary, Priti Patel, must end the toxic narratives around immigration..

Read the article

Home Office blocks baby adopted by UK resident from entering country

A baby whose legal guardian is a UK resident has been blocked from entering the country, leaving her and her soon-to-be adoptive mother “stranded" in Pakistan.

Read the article

David Cameron: The prime mover behind Britain’s hostile environment, who escaped the blame

While Theresa May is seen as the sole architect behind the ‘dehumanising’ policy, ex-ministers detail how the coalition prime minister was its driving force

Read the article

The Home Office Kept Telling This Grandmother Who's Lived In Britain Since She Was 2 To Prove She Was British

In the latest Home Office U-turn on an embarrassing immigration decision, Davinder Singh just won her citizenship battle, but only after the department was told BuzzFeed News was planning a story.

Read the article

Tory minister says EU citizens fleeing domestic abuse should go home

UK IMMIGRATION Minister Caroline Nokes has said that vulnerable EU migrant women living in Scotland and fleeing domestic abuse should just return to their own countries, it has emerged.

Read the article

Home Office chaos and incompetence lead to unlawful detentions, claim whistleblowers

Handling of UK asylum cases compromised by poorly trained and overworked staff 

Read the article

Migrants wrongly told to pay for NHS care upfront, minister admits

Hospitals have wrongly told some migrants needing urgent care to pay for it in advance even though they qualified for free treatment on the NHS, the government has admitted for the first time. 

Read the article

Revealed: how Home Office hires out staff to hunt migrants

Department criticised for ‘escalating hostile environment’ by selling officials’ services to firms

Read the article

View from Westminster: Don't allow EU citizens to be treated like the Windrush Generation

Harriet Harman MP writes: "It should not be the case that you have fewer protections as an immigrant than you would if you had actually committed a crime. For any individual traumatised by indefinite detention, that’s reason to change the policy. But it is now happening on such a scale that it is really important to deal with it."

Read the article

Dozens of Caribbean nationals to be deported on first charter flight to Jamaica since Windrush scandal

Exclusive: Around 50 people set to be deported on charter plane – many in UK since they were children – in what campaigners describe as ‘slap in the face’ for Britain's Caribbean community

Read the article

Two trains, three trams, 5,000 steps: How a mother and baby have to travel five hours to sign on with the Home Office

Read the article

British man and family made homeless after Home Office policy blocks them from renting property

‘I am an Englishman, I served for nine years in the army, I have worked since I was 16 years old and it breaks my heart that my own government seems quite content to make a British citizen, his two British daughters and lawfully resident wife, homeless’

Read the article

Read an explanatory Twitter thread

Dying man given bill for tens of thousands of pounds for NHS treatment

Doctors say making migrant patients pay for NHS palliative care contravenes the Hippocratic oath

Read the article

 

Grandparents face deportation after 40 years

The Iranian-born grandparents of a Scottish rugby player are being threatened with deportation.

Mozaffar Saberi, 83, and his wife Rezvan Habibimarand, 73, moved to Edinburgh 40 years ago. They brought up their four children there and now have 11 grandchildren and a great-grandchild. 

Read the article

‘I wish the Home Office could be made aware’:

The Home Office is trying to force two British-born children with lifelong and complex physical and mental disabilities out of Britain in a move which experts say breaches UK and UN law. “I wish the Home Office could be made aware of the torment and sufferings an applicant goes through as a result of an unlawful and unreasonable decision and its devastating impact especially on his or her children”.

Read the article

‘They've robbed me of my life’:

Jamaican woman who has lived in UK since she was a child facing deportation after losing court battle. Shankea Stewart, whose grandfather was a member of the Windrush generation, said she felt her life had been “robbed”. A judge ruled that she should go back to Jamaica despite the fact her sick father and most other family members live in Britain.

Read the article

Revealed: sick, tortured immigrants locked up for months in Britain

Investigation suggests hundreds of vulnerable people are detained indefinitely. An unprecedented snapshot of migrants held in British detention centres found more than half of the sample were either suicidal, seriously ill or victims of torture.

Read the article

 

Man deemed security threat over tax error faces homelessness

The family of an engineer who trained Ministry of Defence engineers is being made homeless because the Home Office has still not completed a review of a controversial immigration policy it promised to report on by July.

Read the article

'I was treated like an animal': A father arrested and pinned to the ground naked by immigration officers acting on a false tip-off

The DVLA had incorrectly briefed Immigration Enforcement that he was in the UK illegally. Tapiwa’s case reveals the human cost of the information sharing created by the “hostile environment” policy. 

Read the article

'My life is in ruins': wrongly deported Windrush people facing fresh indignity

Those who were sent to Jamaica after committing criminal offences are a low priority for UK government

Read the article

British boy, 6, who has lived in country since birth refused entry to UK on return from holiday

Mohamed Bangoura, born in Leeds in 2012, blocked from reuniting with his mother in Britain after Home Office revoked his passport

Read the article

Hostile environment: anatomy of a policy disaster

Senior figures who worked within and alongside Home Office – including former immigration enforcement chiefs – explain what went so terribly wrong

Read the article

Windrush scandal: boxer trapped in Jamaica for 13 years allowed back to UK

Vernon Vanriel came to the UK in 1962. This week he learned he could return but, ill and destitute, wonders how he will afford the fare

Read the article

Child passport renewal error hits hundreds

More than 1,000 children born in the UK to parents from eight EU countries have been refused British passport renewals because of a Home Office error.

Read the article

What happens if you mistakenly apply for British citizenship instead of indefinite leave to remain?

What happens when an American graduate, about to become eligible for indefinite leave to remain having lived lawfully in the UK for almost a decade, incorrectly thinks that he is eligible to apply for British citizenship and applies for that instead?

Read the article

 

Families torn apart as visa misery hits foreign spouses

‘Hostile environment’ has left couples with one non-EU partner facing discrimination, delays and huge bills

Read the article

 

‘I left my daughter at nursery. I didn’t see her for a month’: how UK splits migrant families

The Home Office uses similar tactics to those of the Trump administration – with devastating effects for parents and children

Read the article

 

Revealed: depth of Home Office failures on Windrush

Government received repeated warnings over several years but failed to take action

Read the article

Widowed father ordered to leave UK against advice of Home Office's own lawyers

Andrew Farotade refused leave to remain under rules intended to tackle terrorism

Read the article

Footage emerges of 'distressing' home visit by immigration officers

Footage has emerged of a dawn immigration enforcement operation by six officers, showing a “distressing” and “intimidating” sequence of events.

The visit to the home of a woman who was in the process of regularising her visa status has raised fresh questions about the fairness and efficiency of Home Office policy.

Read the article

‘Hostile Environment’ immigration policy sees abused women without support and deported

The ‘hostile environment’ immigration policy is being used by abusive men to threaten and control women, and the Government’s focus on immigration enforcement over support is trapping too many women in violent situations – say women’s groups who launch a new briefing and press MPs on the matter at an event in Parliament today (2 May).

Read the article

 

British man who has never even been abroad threatened with deportation to Uganda

Kyle Herbert, from Shrewsbury, was astonished to receive the letter which ordered him to leave the country or risk a £5,000 fine, imprisonment and removal by force

Read the article

 

St Athan dad's bid to prove British citizenship for first holiday

John Ingram, 39, was born in Germany while his parents were serving in the RAF.

The father of two, living in St Athan, Vale of Glamorgan, said his birth certificate was rejected when he tried to get a passport for a trip to Spain.

Read the article

We’re grateful for your Windrush work – but the fight for justice goes on

Immigration solicitor Sheona York says it was clear from 2013 that people in the UK lawfully would be affected, and Diane Astin says the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (Laspo) has much to answer for

Read the letters

Government knew for years that Windrush generation hurt by 'hostile environment'

Home Office letter dated May 2016 shows ministers knew of immigration policy’s impacts

Read the article

DWP sent Windrush pensioner £33,000 bill for disability benefits

Valerie Baker was ordered to return ‘overpayments’ for past claims and threatened with deportation

Read the article

Pressure grows on May and Rudd over Windrush scandal

Sayeeda Warsi says fault with ‘hostile environment’ lies with policy itself not implementation

Read the article

Amber Rudd admits she doesn't know if long term UK residents were wrongly deported in Windrush cases

Labour MP David Lammy blames policies introduced by Theresa May, telling the Commons: 'This is a day of national shame'

Read the article and watch the video

'I thought I would die': Windrush man left homeless after brain surgery

Winston Jones, 62, was evicted while having surgery and denied a hostel place because he had no proof of UK arrival at 16

Read the article

Windrush generation tell of holidays that led to exile and heartbreak

One man was stranded abroad for 21 months, while another missed his mother’s funeral

Read the article

The children of Windrush: 'I’m here legally, but they’re asking me to prove I’m British'

Eight people tell of the harrowing experience of having to prove their status despite having been in the UK legally for half a century

Read the article

Government 'failing to act on serious concerns about NHS data sharing' raised by doctors

MPs accuse government of ‘wholly unsatisfactory’ response after it refuses to act on warnings that immigrants are ‘too frightened’ to access healthcare because of data-sharing policy

Read the article

'I couldn't hold my newborn son': the families split by visa laws

You meet a foreign partner and dream of a life together. But unless you have enough money, UK visa rules make it almost impossible

Read the article

Former Middlesex fast bowler in immigration limbo for seven years

Richard Stewart came to the UK in 1955 and paid taxes for five decades but is having problems getting a British passport

Read the article

 

I've been an NHS doctor for five years. The Home Office wants to deport me

Dr Luke Ong was five months away from becoming a GP when he made a simple error with his application to remain in the UK

Read the article

 

Vulnerable EU citizens risk failing to secure right to remain in UK

Academics warn that people may not be aware they need to apply for ‘settled status’ after Brexit

Read the article

Read the originating report

 

Man living in UK for 56 years loses job over immigration papers. 

Michael Braithwaite, a special needs assistant, was told he could not be employed at school as he did not have biometric card.

Read the article

Londoner denied NHS cancer care: 'It's like I'm being left to die'

When Albert Thompson went for his first radiotherapy session for prostate cancer in November he says he was surprised to be taken aside by a hospital administrator and told that unless he could produce a British passport he would be charged £54,000 for the treatment.

Thompson has lived in London for 44 years, having arrived from Jamaica as a teenager, and although he has worked as a mechanic and paid taxes for more than three decades, the Home Office is disputing his eligibility to remain.

Read the article

‘I felt a nausea of fury’ – how I faced the cruelty of Britain's immigration system

When Nesrine Malik was finally granted British citizenship her relief was dulled by exhaustion after years of struggle against a Home Office bent on reducing immigration to the illusory ‘tens of thousands’

Read the article

Number of EU nationals being detained at immigration removal centres increases fivefold since Conservatives came into power

Almost 1,300 EU nationals were detained in the third quarter of last year, compared with 242 when the coalition came into power in 2010, according to Home Office figures.

Read the article

Home Office faces legal challenges over 'right to rent' migrant policy

Two separate legal challenges have been launched against the government's 'right to rent' policy, which critics claim forces landlords to act as border guards. Home Office rules in force since February 2016 demand that landlords check if a potential tenant has the right to live in the UK before letting a property to them.

Now, in the latest of a series of legal challenges against the government's 'hostile environment' for undocumented migrants, two cases are being taken to court which could end up reversing the policy.

Read the article

 

Home Office policy of deporting homeless EU citizens is illegal, High Court rules

Mrs Justice Lang said measures introduced last year were discriminatory and violated European law, following a challenge by two Polish men and a Latvian.

The three men were all facing removal because they were found by police and immigration officers sleeping rough.

Mrs Justice Lang said homelessness alone did not meet the legal requirements for deportation, even if accompanied by offences including begging, drinking and nuisance.

“There has been a significant increase in rough sleepers of all nationalities,” she said. “The policy discriminated unlawfully against EEA [European Economic Area] nationals and rough sleepers.”

Read the article

 

Home Office gets banks to check immigration status of account holders

Millions of current accounts to be scrutinised in hunt for migrants liable for deportation or who have absconded from detention.

Read the article

 

The cost of Access to Justice as a Constitutional Issue

The issue of access to justice, and specifically the cost of litigation as a bar to accessing justice, is rightly becoming a major constitutional issue in the UK.

“It is all very well for us to sing the praises of our legal systems, to congratulate ourselves on the high quality of our judges and lawyers, and to take pride in the popularity of the common law in international business. But we have a serious problem with access to justice for ordinary citizens and small and medium sized businesses.”

Read the article

 

The death of a Pole was one of three suicides in detention centres in a month, and relatives claim the Home Office is covering up cell deaths

Britain remains the only country in Europe with no time limit on immigration detention. With detainees’ lives in limbo, psychologists agree that the system affects mental health. Two years ago MPs joined campaigners in urging a 28-day limit on immigration detention, and only then as an “absolute last resort”.

Read the article

'I miss her so much': NHS doctor separated from daughter

An Egyptian doctor recruited by the NHS in 2016 has had an application for her three-year-old daughter to come to the UK rejected.

Watch the video

A woman who reported being kidnapped and raped over a six month period to the police was arrested as she sought care

​The shocking case reveals how far Theresa May's 'hostile environment' towards immigrants has gone and raises serious questions about whether immigration enforcement practices are now discouraging the victims of crimes from reporting them to the police.

Read the article

 

Botanics chief 'flabbergasted' over Brexit uncertainty facing French wife

She said was refused the card on the grounds of self-sufficiency and although she did “a bit of upholstery”, she relied on her husband.

Read the article

 

'Hostile environment': the hardline Home Office policy tearing families apart

This Australian NHS critical care nurse with 3 British children, the youngest of which needs constant care, was refused an extension to her spouse visa. She told some mothers at the school gate about her plight, and they organised a campaign, persuading at least 50 people to email their local MP – who happens to be health secretary Jeremy Hunt. Hunt rang the family and promised to personally take up their battle. Two weeks later her visa was in her hand.​

“I’m still deeply shocked by the experience,” she says. “The Home Office rang and apologised to us, but didn’t explain what had gone wrong. The thing is, it’s turned out fine for us, but what about people who don’t have any friends, or an engaged, influential MP? Or, frankly, who aren’t middle class and vocal? It’s a terrible system. It’s really unfair”

Read the article

 

A woman who had been in Britain for 50 years received a letter informing her that she was an illegal immigrant and was going to be removed and sent back to Jamaica, the country she left when she was 10 and has never visited since

Last month, she spent a week at Yarl’s Wood detention centre before being sent to the immigration removal centre at Heathrow, where detainees are taken just before they are flown out of the country. It was only a last-minute intervention from her MP and a local charity that prevented a forced removal. 

Read the article

 

Vulnerable women ‘still locked up in Yarl's Wood immigration centre’​

Vivian (not her real name), from West Africa, was held in Yarl’s Wood despite disclosing in her asylum interview with the Home Office that she had been forced into prostitution by her husband. The Home Office accepted she was a survivor of gender-based violence, yet Vivian was still detained for six months.

Read the article

More articles on Yarl's Wood here and here and here.

 

British-American family split across Atlantic after Home Office error

The Home Office is urgently reviewing the case of a British-American family hit by costs of £45,000 and split between different sides of the Atlantic after it refused to reverse a visa decision based on a misinterpretation of its own rules.

Read the article

 

A British man has been told his Ecuadorian wife cannot settle in the UK despite the couple having three young children, including a baby who is still breastfeeding.

The Home Office letter states: "The right to family life is qualified and balanced against the need to maintain an effective immigration and border control.”​

Read the article

 

A Fijian father-of-two who has settled in Wales after serving in the British Army for 12 years claims he’s been told he can no longer legally work while his application for indefinite leave to remain in the UK is considered by the Home Office

He claims the application for British Citizenship was unsuccessful because he had three points on his driving licence, so he reapplied in September 2016, and claims he was then advised to apply for indefinite leave to remain in the UK instead, which he then did in February this year.

Read the article

 

A family with three young British children is set to be torn apart by immigration rules after the dad lost his job in Dubai and his wife was denied a visa to the UK

The family say the Home Office doesn't think the children's lives would be disrupted if the mother doesn't live with them.

Read the article

 

A distressed husband has hit out at the Home Office spouse visa system after his Thai wife of eight years was denied residence in the UK, due to insufficient funds in his bank account

The couple have two children, both British citizens, and the refusal means that he has not seen his wife or daughter, almost three, for more than a year.

Read the article

 

An Australian family saved from deportation following the intervention of the First Minister is again facing uncertainty over their future

​Mr Brain said his family have no access to public funds, mortgages, tax credits and are not able to get a phone contract due to their visa status. "We have lost over a year's income between us, have debt of about £30,000 and that's after all the help we have had from people - some of whom I am sure are in this room today."

​Read the article

 

The two adopted children of an American NHS specialist and his British wife have been granted visas, but only after a newspaper highlighted their plight

​The family had repeatedly failed to persuade the Home Office to give their two adopted sons, Benjamin and Edward, aged 10 and 12, permission to live in the UK. They were stopped at Heathrow in March 2016 and the two boys refused entry, although the couple’s third biological child was allowed into the country, leaving the family stranded on opposite sides of the Atlantic.  

Read the article

 

A Yorkshire family are being ripped apart after a three year battle with the Home Office to remain in the UK.

Faced with staying here alone, the Leeds born war veteran - who served in two Gulf wars, Northern Ireland, Kosovo and did three tours of Bosnia - will have to leave his job, pals and elderly and ill parents to keep his family together. 

The couple got married in 2006 and have three teenage children.

Read the article

 

A devastated St Albans dad-to-be has said his new family will be torn apart when his wife is deported to China

​Their first application for a spousal visa was refused because of an income miscommunication, which he says is now resolved.​

His wife is now pregnant and they have received a refusal to the second application, seven months later - during which time she has had no access to NHS treatment.​

The decision notice letter said "There is no reason why you could not relocate to China and enjoy your family life there."​

Read the article

 

A husband and wife of 15 years face a nail-biting wait for officials to decide if they will be reunited after months apart

Having lived in Asia and the Middle East – most recently in Qatar – they moved to the home of his widowed mother 18 months ago.

​“In all of the places we’ve lived, when we provided documents to show we were a family, the process of getting a visa was pretty straightforward,” said the 56-year-old, originally from Tilbury.

​“The only place we’ve faced problems is here in the UK, where I came to be closer to my mother and send the boys to a local school. In accordance with the rules, my wife left when required.”

Read the article

 

A British stroke victim who uses a wheelchair, requires 24-hour supervision to keep him alive and cannot speak, write or reliably understand what is said to him, has been told by the Home Office that he must become the sole carer for his two young British children while his wife travels to the Philippines to apply for a visa to care for the family

​The Home Office said there were no 'exceptional circumstances' allowing her to apply for a visa from within the UK.

Read the article

 

A FAMILY of five who returned to Scotland almost two years ago after the British father’s elderly parents’ health started to fail faces being split up after the Home Office refused his Australian wife permission to stay here.

The couple have been married for 19 years and have three children, the eldest born in Scotland, the younger two born in Australia but holding dual UK-Australian citizenship.

​Their MP said "It’s mad, crass and insensitive and is tearing apart the very families the Government claims to support. There’s no compassion or common decency in the immigration policies of the UK Government. What I’ve detected from many of the messages I’ve had and you’ve had is that people are furious about this and rightly so.”

Read the article

 

American mother who has been told she must leave her British husband and daughter in the UK, with the family apart for up to a year because of the government’s minimum income rules

​In the initial letter refusing a spousal visa, the Home Office said it had no concerns that their two-year-old daughter's welfare would be disadvantaged if she was separated from her mother.

Read the article

 

A British former soldier is being forced to live apart from his wife and three young children after the Home Office refused to grant her a visa 

His children are allowed into the UK, but his wife is not - and he claims he has not been told why.

He launched a visa appeal, which takes 18 months to come through the courts. He cannot afford legal representation and is not entitled to legal aid.​

Read the article

 

Former soldier unable to provide for his family following visa error by Government office

Although the Home Office has accepted it made a mistake in rejecting his new visa application, he is unable to work and provide for his family until it is sorted out, which could take months.
Read the article

 

A Canadian biodiversity lecturer at the University of Glasgow living in Bearsden, has been told he must leave his wife and two children after the Home Office refused to renew his visa

His wife qualifies for British citizenship and is applying and his youngest daughter was born in the UK.​

Read the article

Suspected terrorists can only be held for 14 days without charge, yet asylum-seekers and migrants can be held indefinitely

​Detention has been described as the “black hole at the heart of British justice”. Thousands of people, most of whom have been convicted of no crime, detained for as long as government officials wish.

​Britain is the only country in Europe to allow the indefinite detention of migrants – leaving them in a legal limbo condemned as “barbaric” and abhorrent” by critics.

Read the article

 

Theresa May has been asked to intervene in the extraordinary case of an American couple who’ve lived in Inverness for years, and face being deported because of a “retrospective” change to immigration laws

​SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford asked the Prime Minister to meet with him to discuss the case of Russell and Ellen Felber, who have spent more than £400,000 buying and refurbishing a guest house in the Highland capital.

Read the article

 

Academics engaged in overseas research must frequently travel abroad to work. The Home Office, however, uses the time spent out of the country by foreign academics while they are working to deny their applications for settlement visas

​“The threat hanging over me of being thrown out of the country at any point has been massively destabilising and damaging both in terms of my career and my personal life. We feel completely let down by this country. The Home Office have had my passport for over a year and I have no idea when I will get it back. I have not seen my elderly parents in over a year and a half now. Why would the Home Office want to get rid of two highly skilled, UK-trained heritage professionals providing valuable contributions to the British Museum and a major UK higher education institution? Most countries want to retain highly trained experts, not push them out.”

Read the article

 

A Polish national, and his wife said they went to the police after their landlord walked into the flat they were renting with two other men, all wearing balaclavas, and forced the couple out after threatening them with a kitchen knife and a baseball bat.

The wife was injured in the attack and needed hospital treatment, she said. However, when the couple reported the attack to the police, they questioned the couple about their immigration status and handed the husband over to immigration officials, who detained him in Colnbrook Immigration Removal Centre near Heathrow where he remains.

​He is an EU national who was legally working in the UK until he was arrested and detained. He has criminal convictions in Poland dating back to 1990 for a series of crimes, including robbery and neglecting his military duties. He served prison time for those offences and, under its own rules, the Home Office cannot deport solely on the basis of previous convictions that have already been punished.

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